Grilled stuffed red pine mushrooms with cheese

September 29th, 2014 § 0

Autumn is the time for mushrooms.

The saffron milk cap or red pine mushroom (in Turkish melki and κουμαρίτης in Greek) grows under pine trees during Autumn after a good rain.

In Turkey, this type of mushroom can be find in Balıkesir region as well as Western Blacksea like Bolu or Mengen.

It is also known as milky saffron mushroom, as it exudes a milky orange to apricot fluid when cut. The damaged mushroom turns to green colour.

These orange coloured mega mushrooms can be grilled and served as a savory food.

  • 1/2 kg saffron milk cap mushroom
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 50 gr Cheddar cheese (grated)
  • 50 gr Parmesan cheese (grated)
  • Clean the mushrooms, but never soak in a bowl.

    Coat the mushrooms with extra virgin olive oil. Shake on a bit of salt and pepper.

    Fill each mushroom cap with generous grated Cheddar and Parmesan cheese.

    Place the mushrooms stuffing side up and grill them for about 20 minutes.

    Serve immediately.

    Artichoke with fava sauce

    June 10th, 2014 § 0

  • 8 artichokes with stems
  • 1 medium onion
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 4 T. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 lemons
  • deep pot covered with water and 1 lemon juice
  • 1 t. sugar
  • salt
  • Start breaking off outer leaves by using a rubber glove.

    Leave 1cm lenght of the stem and trim the rest. Peel the artichoke until tender leaves in the center.

    Rub with lemon the peeled part of the artichoke. Now remove the tender leaves and hairy chokes with a teaspoon.

    Immediately rub with lemon to stop discolouring. Place the peeled artihokes in a deep pot with enough water and lemon juice mixture.

    Peel the stems and cut them about 10 cm. long sticks. Immerse them also in water and lemon mixture.

    Saute the chopped onion with oil in the pressure cooker. Place the artichokes to the pressure cooker by controlling whether they are discoloured.

    If yes, before placing to the pressure cooker, re-carve tenderly only the darkened parts with a knife edge.

    Add 3/4 cup of water,1 t. lemon juice, salt and sugar. Cook 10 – 15 minutes until the artichokes are tender.

    for the fava sauce:

  • 1/2 cup dried horse beans (dry fava ~ Φάβα Σαντορίνης)
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 T extra virgin olive oil
  • lemon juice
  • salt
  • parsley (to garnish)
  • Soak overnight the dry fava in water.

    Next day, cook fava with onion in a pressure cooker until soft.

    Put the well boiled dry fava in a food processor. Add extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice and salt.

    Mix until it is smooth and thick. Make a fava puree.

    Pour the fava puree to a serving plate and place the artichokes on it.

    Garnish with parsley.

    Fried red pine mushroom

    October 14th, 2013 § 0

    The saffron milk cap or red pine mushroom (in Turkish melki- κουμαρίτης in Greek) grows under pine trees during autumn after warm sunny days and a good rain.

    They are abundant in pine plantations especially in lowland and shady areas.  In Turkey, this type of mushroom can be find in Balıkesir region as well as Western Blacksea like Bolu or Mengen.

    It is known as milky saffron mushroom , as it exudes a milky orange to apricot fluid when cut. The damaged mushroom turns to green colour.

    There are some poisonous lookalikes which can be mistaken with saffron milk cap easily.

    Commonly grow under pine trees during late summer to autumn, after warm sunny days and good rain. Often known as milky saffron, as they exude a milky orange sap when cut. Vibrant saffron-coloured cap, gills and stem. Firm texture. Full, roasted nut flavour.
    PreparationDiscard stems before use.
    UsageYoung pine mushrooms are tender and suitable with fresh pasta and egg-based dishes. Older, larger specimens require long, slow cooking – best in casseroles and stews.

    - See more at: http://www.powerofmushrooms.com.au/did-you-know/mushroom-varieties/wild-mushrooms/#sthash.3fKX4Gn0.dpuf

    Commonly grow under pine trees during late summer to autumn, after warm sunny days and good rain. Often known as milky saffron, as they exude a milky orange sap when cut. Vibrant saffron-coloured cap, gills and stem. Firm texture. Full, roasted nut flavour. – See more at: http://www.powerofmushrooms.com.au/did-you-know/mushroom-varieties/wild-mushrooms/#sthash.3fKX4Gn0.dpuf
    Commonly grow under pine trees during late summer to autumn, after warm sunny days and good rain. Often known as milky saffron, as they exude a milky orange sap when cut. Vibrant saffron-coloured cap, gills and stem. Firm texture. Full, roasted nut flavour.
    PreparationDiscard stems before use.
    UsageYoung pine mushrooms are tender and suitable with fresh pasta and egg-based dishes. Older, larger specimens require long, slow cooking – best in casseroles and stews.

    - See more at: http://www.powerofmushrooms.com.au/did-you-know/mushroom-varieties/wild-mushrooms/#sthash.3fKX4Gn0.dpuf

  • 1/2 kg saffron milk cap mushroom
  • 1/4 cup  extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • salt
  • pepper
  • Clean and wash the mushrooms.

    Boil for about ten minutes. Dry them.

    Mix flour, salt with 1/4 cup water and make a batter.

    Dip the mushrooms into the batter, letting excess batter drip off.
    Deep fry in olive oil until golden.
    You can also saute them.
  • 1/2 kg saffron milk cap mushroom
  • 2 cloves of garlic (minced)
  • 3 T cup  extra virgin olive oil
  • dill
  • salt and pepper
  • After boiling the mushroom, put the olive oil into a large pan.

    Add minced garlic with  mushrooms and saute for 5 minutes.

    Add salt and pepper to taste.

    Before serving decorate with dill.

    Commonly grow under pine trees during late summer to autumn, after warm sunny days and good rain. Often known as milky saffron, as they exude a milky orange sap when cut. Vibrant saffron-coloured cap, gills and stem. Firm texture. Full, roasted nut flavour.
    PreparationDiscard stems before use.
    UsageYoung pine mushrooms are tender and suitable with fresh pasta and egg-based dishes. Older, larger specimens require long, slow cooking – best in casseroles and stews.

    - See more at: http://www.powerofmushrooms.com.au/did-you-know/mushroom-varieties/wild-mushrooms/#sthash.3fKX4Gn0.dpuf

    Stuffed aubergine with mushroom and cherry tomato

    June 28th, 2013 § 0

  • 2 aubergines
  • 1 onion (chopped)
  • 2 garlic cloves (finely chopped)
  • 10 cherry tomatoes (halved)
  • 20 mushrooms (sliced)
  • 3 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 100 gr mozzarella cheese (grated or cut into bite sizes)
  • basil leaves (finely chopped)
  • 2 T breadcrumbs
  • Slice the aubergines in half length ways leaving the stem intact.

    Brush them with olive oil and place them in a baking tray covered with foil.

    Bake in 200°C pre-heated  oven about 20 minutes until they are tender.

    While baking the aubergines, add 1 T extra virgin olive oil to a non-stick frying pan.

    Add the onion and cook until soft.  Tip in the garlic, mushrooms, tomatoes and cook for extra 5 minutes.

    Season with basil. Finally add mozzarella and breadcrumbs.

    On each aubergine place some stuffing mixture with the help of a spoon.

    Drizzle with oil and bake for 20 minutes until they are done.

    Wild Pistacia (τσιτσίραβλα ~ sakız murcu) salad

    April 25th, 2013 § 0

    The wild pistachio tree or in latin pistacia terebinthus (menengiç tree in Turkish), is a kind of tree native to South Eastern part of Turkey like Antakya or Kahramanmaraş, also East of Greece like Volos, Athens or Crete.

    When the tree leaves out spring, the bright green shoots are picked by the locals. Then as a vegetable, the shoots are generally boiled.

    In Turkey the name changes according to the region. For instance in Antakya, it is called sakız murcu while in Kahramanmaraş it is purçalık or ıçkın.

    In Volos, Greece it is tsitsiravla (τσιτσίραβλα).

    Whatever the name, the amazing thing is in both countries the recipes are almost the same.

    If by chance you visit Volos in spring, don’t miss to try this appetizer~ meze, which goes well with uzo or tsipouro.

  • 250 gr pistacia terebinthus (the fresh shoots of the tree)
  • 3 fresh onions
  • 3 cloves of fresh garlic (crushed)
  • 8 T. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 T white wine vinegar
  • salt
  • In a large serving bowl, stir the crushed garlic with olive oil. Add the chopped fresh onions.

    Add salt and vinegar and let the dressing sit until you prepare the tsisiravlas.

    Wash the freshly picked shoots.

    Bring a large pot of water boil.

    Carefully submerge the greens in it.

    Boil for about 15 minutes.

    Add the boiled greens to the serving bowl with the dressing.

    Toss until all the leaves are coated in the dressing.

    Serve immediately.

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