Chocolate chestnut truffles

October 23rd, 2012 § 0

Chestnut is harvested in October and November. It is a rich source of starch and protein.

Bursa city chestnut has a widespread fame since ancient times.

The candied chestnut of this city was introduced into Europe and known as marron glace.

What can be better than a delicious chocolate hazelnut truffle to celebrate a holiday?

  • 1/2 kg chestnut
  • 50 gr couverture chocolate
  • 2 T cacao powder
  • 1 t. vanilla extract powder
  • 1/4 cup petite beurre biscuits (chopped)
  • 1/4 cup cup coarsely chopped hazelnut

Boil the chestnuts in pressure cooker by adding a pinch of salt and sugar to the water. Peel and mash them until smooth.

Melt the bittersweet chocolate with bain-marie method, or simply put water in a thick bottom pan. Inside this pan place another pan with the couverture chocolate.

In a bowl mix chestnut puree, melted chocolate, cacao, vanilla and chopped biscuits well.

Roll into balls and dust with chopped hazelnut.

Leave to cool in the refrigerator.

Chocolate crepes

June 2nd, 2012 § 0

An attractive way to turn simple ingredients into a mouth watering dessert.

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 T flour
  • 3 T good quality cocoa powder
  • 1 T sugar
  • 1 t baking powder
  • a pinch of salt
  • 2 T butter

Rub the frying pan with butter. Place over a moderate heat.

Beat eggs and add the remaining ingredients. Blend well until the batter will be a light cream.

When the heavy frying pan is very hot, pour just enough batter to cover the pan with a very thin layer. If necessary, tilt the pan to spread evenly to the pan.

Decrease the heat so the batter will cook slowly.

Cook it on one side, then brown it on the other. Turn with a spatula or flip in the air, if you can!

Pour in the butter again and pour it out again for the next crepes.

for the filling:

  • 6 T chocolate drops
  • While the second crepe cooks, spread 1 T chocolate drops over the first crepe.

    Roll it and put it into a cooky sheet to keep warm.

    Serve warm. Makes 8-10 crepes.

    May Rose on Hıdrellez (May 5)

    May 5th, 2012 § 0

     Hıdrellez, is one of the traditional festival which is celebrated on May 5 and 6 as the first days of the early summer in Turkey. It is the day of Hızır, on which prophets Hızır and Ilyas met with each other on earth. Since then the words Hızır and İlyas have pronounced as Hıdrellez. It is believed that Hızır is a prophet who has attained immortality by drinking the water of life and who has reached God. During spring, he walks among people from time to time and helps to those in difficulty and distributes wealth and health. He is the symbol of spring and the new life. The belief in Hıdrellez is widespread in Turkey and is celebrated with grand ceremonies like the traditional fire of the evening.

    On Hıdrellez (5th of May) people write down their wishes on a memo paper and leave this paper at the foot of a rose tree, in the belief that Hıdır will come in the night to grant their wishes come true. On the morning of Hıdrellez (6th of May) people gather in a previously decided house with a courtyard or garden and sing songs. 

    Everyone enjoys a delightful spring dishes.

    Happy spring!

    May 1st, 2012 § 0

    A bright and beautiful season full of colours and smiles!

    Wreaths have much history and symbolism. They are usually made from flowers or evergreens to symbolize strength.

    In Greece on May Day, generally people arrive from all big cities to the countryside to pick all kinds of flowers including wild flowers for the wreaths.

    Then they hang the flower wreaths on their front doors until 24 June. On that day, they burn the dried wreaths in a big fire.

    To symbolize a wish for a good harvest, farmers also make wreaths using wheat or the branches from fruit and nut trees.

    The May Day wreath custom is said to be a Pagan rituel and seen in Turkey’s Bozcaada island.

    Tulips in Istanbul

    April 30th, 2012 § 1

     

    Every civilization has certain objects that represent its character. It is said that Turks brought tulip from Central Asia together with them.

    In Istanbul during the Ottoman era, colourful lantern processions with tulips were organized every year. Poet couplets mentioned tulip, while painters, paper marbling artist, tile makers, engravers and marble sculptors worked tulip design.

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